FANDOM


Yaupon Holly
Ilex vomitoria.jpg
Foliage and fruit
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
Unranked: Angiosperms
Unranked: Eudicots
Unranked: Asterids
Order: Aquifoliales
Family: Aquifoliaceae
Genus: Ilex
Species: I. vomitoria
Binomial name
Ilex vomitoria
Aiton

Ilex vomitoria (Yaupon Holly, Yaupon, or Cassina; the latter shared with Ilex cassine), is a species of holly native to southeastern North America, occurring in United States from Maryland south to Florida and west to Oklahoma (only in the extreme southeast)[1] and Texas, and in Mexico in Chiapas.[2]

It is an evergreen shrub or small tree reaching 5-9 m tall, with smooth, light gray bark and slender, hairy shoots. The leaves are alternate, ovate to elliptical with a rounded apex and crenate or coarsely serrated margin, 1-4.5 cm long and 1-2 cm broad, glossy dark green above, slightly paler below. The flowers are 5–5.5 mm diameter, with a white four-lobed corolla. The fruit is a small round, shiny, and red (occasionally yellow) drupe 4-6 mm diameter containing four pits, which are dispersed by birds eating the fruit. The species may be distinguished from the similar Ilex cassine by its smaller leaves with a rounded, not acute apex.[3][4][5][1][6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Oklahoma Biological Survey: Ilex vomitoria
  2. Germplasm Resources Information Network: Ilex vomitoria
  3. USDA Plant Guide: yaupon Ilex vomitoria (doc file)
  4. Florida Department of Environmental Protection: Florida's Hollies
  5. Martin, C. O., & Mott, S. P. (1997). Yaupon (Ilex vomitoria): Section 7.5.10,U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Wildlife Resources Management Manual. Technical Report EL-97-16, U.S. Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS. Available online (pdf file)
  6. Bioimages: Ilex vomitoria

Ad blocker interference detected!


Wikia is a free-to-use site that makes money from advertising. We have a modified experience for viewers using ad blockers

Wikia is not accessible if you’ve made further modifications. Remove the custom ad blocker rule(s) and the page will load as expected.